Lucretia Garfield. Library Of Congres

The identity of God

Jesus was one of the end time prophets travelling around in Israel and Palestine at a time when the Jews began to resist Roman occupation. He stood at the cradle of Christianity, a global religion with more than two billion followers. It is an enigma that baffles historians. Six centuries later, in an equally astounding turn of history, a small band of Arab warriors created an empire that stretched from the Atlantic to India. They spread a religion called Islam. These historic turns made the God of Abraham the dominant deity on the planet, which may help to fulfil a promise allegedly made to Abraham.1

Archaeological evidence indicates that the Jews invented their deity Yahweh. It was one of the thousands of gods humans imagined. Nevertheless, this particular Jewish deity became the dominant god on this planet and this doesn’t appear to be an accident. This universe might be a virtual reality created by an advanced civilisation for the purpose of entertaining someone we call God. And God might use avatars and appear as an ordinary human to us. So what was so special about Jesus compared to all the other end-time prophets? Perhaps he knew the avatar of God.

The Gospels state that Jesus had a personal and intimate relationship with God. Scholars agree that the Gospels have been edited.2 Apparently God the ‘Father’ can give birth.3 Jesus is referred to as the Bridegroom and Son of God. Jesus felt that he was so special that he believed that no one comes to God except through him.4

Mary Magdalene may have been the Bride and the Gospels could originally have stated that Jesus was a reincarnation of Adam and that Mary Magdalene was a reincarnation of Eve. Eve may not have been made out of the rib of Adam but Eve may have given birth to Adam. Eve is called Mother of All the Living,5 Adam is named Son of God6 while Jesus is the firstborn of all creation,7 hence Adam may have been born and Jesus was his reincarnation.

Initially Christianity might have been about the marriage between Mary Magdalene and Jesus representing the Kingdom of God. The love of God Jesus was speaking of8 may have been the love of a Goddess for her husband. This could explain why Christians believe that God is love.9 It sheds some new light on Jesus’ assertion that he is one with God10 as marriage is the way to become one with another person.11

It makes no sense that a woman was created from the rib of a man. It makes more sense that the woman gave birth to the man. Mary Magdalene may have convinced Jesus that Eve was the mother of Adam. The Quran mentions the creation of Adam extensively but tells little about the creation of Eve. The Quran states that Jesus’ creation is like that of Adam and that they were both created from dust.12 It may indicate that Adam was born as the first son of the virgin Eve and that God can perform such miracles as the Quran also contends that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was a virgin.13

The Jewish scriptures allow for the idea that Abraham was a husband of God like Joseph, Moses and David. Muhammad might have been God’s husband too. At the age of twenty-five he married his boss, the merchant Khadijah Bint Khuwaylid. She was a widow and she was much older than Muhammad. Khadijah was the first to convert to Islam after he had his first vision and her support was invaluable to his mission. Avatars of God may have played a significant role in history. And God could still be dwelling amongst us and appear like an ordinary human to us.

What if God was one of us?
Just a slob like one of us
Just a stranger on the bus
Trying to make his way home?
Just trying to make his way home
Like back up to heaven all alone
Nobody calling on the phone
Except for the Pope maybe in Rome
And yeah, yeah, God is great
Yeah, yeah, God is good
And yeah, yeah, yeah-yeah-yeah

– Joan Osborne, What If God Was One Of Us

Featured image: Lucretia Garfield. Library Of Congres.

1. Genesis 12:3 [link]
2. Jesus Before the Gospels: How the Earliest Christians Remembered, Changed, and Invented Their Stories of the Saviour. Bart Ehrman (2016). Harper Collins Publishers.
3. John 1:12-13 [link]
4. John 14:6 [link]
5. Genesis 3:20 [link]
6. Luke 3:38 [link]
7. Colossians 1:15 [link]
8. John 17:23-26 [link]
9. John 10:30 [link]
10. Mark 10:8 [link], Matthew 19:5 [link]
11. 1 John 4:16  [link]
12. Quran 3:59 [link]
13. Quran 3:47 [link]

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